Compassion and wisdom are the two wings of the spiritual life. Without one or the other there will be no liberation from suffering. No truly lasting peace. Which is our goal. A sustainable future for each individual and the world as a whole. It's time to follow your heart and do and live as you feel is right. Let's take back the reigns on our lives and live in accordance with all that is true. In love. In peace. In wisdom.
In regards to my race I am white. This is not a colorblind blog, race is integral to the discussion. Intersectional awareness is of utmost importance to the dialogue.

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

"I love women," is not a get out of jail free card. Thicke pulled the same bullshit when he was accused of degrading women in "Blurred Lines": "When we made the song, we had nothing but the most respect for women," he said. How nice of you to say so, Mr. Thicke. Alas, your work shows the opposite to be true. I am fairly certain many of the men who buy sex and consume porn also think they do it because they really, really, love women. NOPE. You love women like I love wine — as something I consume selfishly for my personal benefit and as a product.

Meghan Murphy (No, “female-appreciation” is not the same thing as feminism)

Full article here

(via lullabysounds)

Women are not a product. 

It’s like the old, tired, “sex sells” cliche, which is used to justify misogyny. It isn’t sex they’re selling, or the men would be just as sexualized. They are selling misogyny.

(via therealcie)

(Source: casocracy)

Saying almost anything as well as you can say it, or doing anything properly and with your whole being, is a political act. And so I think almost any text that strives to have its own focus, without bowing to contemporary modes of humor or a little commercialism or whatever else—I think that’s very political. As long as everyone decides to hold and contain their own state, things improve.

—Jesse Ball (via mttbll)

(Source: theparisreview.org)

losolomirus:

pervocracy:

gobelin:

girls aren’t “easy”, girls don’t have difficulty levels. some girls like sex and some girls don’t. you aren’t winning anything by getting either of them to sleep with you.

Some girls only want sex after emotional closeness develops, but to call this “difficulty” says some really disturbing shit about what you think emotional closeness is for.

THANK YOU.

strugglingtobeheard:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

glitter—skull:

Black ASL - Extremely interesting video talking about how black ASL is similar to AAVE (African American Vernacular English). And I’m just like…ummmm, hell yes! Finally I can learn how to sign the same way I speak. 

oooh, fun fact: did you know, before the civil rights movement, even the deaf schools were segregated? so black and white deaf children were not allowed to interact with each other, and that basically started black ASL. (interessssttiiiinggggg!!!!)

anyways, i’ve had a really bad day, and this just made me a bit too excited.

this is so awesome too bc i don’t even know ASL but i can see the movements of our shit, our facial expressions, etc.

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

—Scott Wood (X)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem)

blackqueerboi:

If you ask for respect and the other person starts coming up with excuses,

…RUN.

Respect is non-negotiable.

One should not excessively seek partners or friends, one should seek to know and be oneself. As you begin to awaken to the Truth, you start noticing how well life flows by itself and how well you are cared for. Life supports the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual needs of the one who is open to self-discovery. Trust opens your eyes to the recognition of this. Surrender allows you to merge in your own Eternal Being.

—Mooji (via lazyyogi)

If you are 35 or younger - and quite often, older - the advice of the old economy does not apply to you. You live in the post-employment economy, where corporations have decided not to pay people. Profits are still high. The money is still there. But not for you. You will work without a raise, benefits, or job security. Survival is now a laudable aspiration.

Quoted from Sarah Kendzior’s “Surviving the Post-Employment Economy

“In the United States, nine percent of computer science majors are unemployed, and 14.7 percent of those who hold degrees in information systems have no job. Graduates with degrees in STEM - science, technology, engineering and medicine - are facing record joblessness, with unemployment at more than twice pre-recession levels. The job market for law degree holders continues to erode, with only 55 percent of 2011 law graduates in full-time jobs. Even in the military, that behemoth of the national budget, positions are being eliminated or becoming contingent due to the sequester.

It is not skills or majors that are being devalued. It is people.”

Her work is frank, speaking of a reality I hope that will never be mine. At the same time, it gives me a strange comfort to know that I am not alone.

(via sextus—empiricus)

I will always reblog this quote.  Hits way too close to home for me.

(via missbananafish)

The most salient part of this, to me, is the underscoring of the fact that there is no “right” college major where you’re guaranteed a job forever. Conservatives love to pretend college graduates working minimum-wage or freelance jobs just didn’t “pick the right major” - those foolish fools studied the arts or literature or something else frivolous, so they deserve crushing debt and no job security! No. There is no magical college major that will let you sidestep the jobless recovery.

(via teh-den)